How Your Support Helps

 

 

Prouty Pilot Projects

Dollars raised by the Friends are contributed to Norris Cotton Cancer Center as unrestricted funds, which support high-quality programs and projects for which there are few other sources of funding.

Allocation of Friends contributions is determined through peer review by the Cancer Center leadership through its Executive Committee and its Cancer Research Committee.

One of the most important mechanisms to enrich research at the Cancer Center is Prouty Pilot Projects. These awards are given to creative investigators with new ideas, allowing them time and resources to test those ideas. A Prouty award enables the investigator to develop data that will become the basis for competitive research applications for federal or other national funding to support his or her research.

Prouty Funds Making a Difference

At the Friends Annual Fall Receptions, researchers who have received Prouty pilot project funding talk about the research the Prouty funds have supported. These Prouty funds helped make larger federal grants possible, furthering their research.

"Fighting Cancer Tooth and Nail"

At the 2011 Friends Annual Fall Reception, Harold Swartz, MD, PhD, and Ann Flood, PhD, presented "Fighting Cancer Tooth and Nail." The video begins with welcomes from Mark Israel, MD, Director of Norris Cotton Cancer Center, and Dan Jantzen, Chief Operating Officer of Dartmouth-Hitchcock.

  

Harold Swartz, MD, PhD, and Ann Flood, PhD, present "Fighting Cancer Tooth and Nail."

"Achilles Heel of Cancer"

At the 2010 Friends Annual Fall Reception, P. Jack Hoopes, DVM, talked about the new Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence award, and Yolanda Sanchez, PhD, told the audience about finding the "Achilles Heel of Cancer."

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P. Jack Hoopes, DVM, talks about the new Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence award, and Yolanda Sanchez, PhD, tells the audience about finding the "Achilles Heel of Cancer."

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