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Dyggve Melchior Clausen syndrome

National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

Important

It is possible that the main title of the report Dyggve Melchior Clausen syndrome is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

Synonyms

  • DMC disease
  • pseudo-Morquio disease type I

Disorder Subdivisions

  • Smith-McCort syndrome

General Discussion

Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen (DMC) syndrome is a rare, progressive genetic disorder characterized by abnormal skeletal development, microcephaly and intellectual disability. The condition was first reported by Dyggve, Melchior and Clausen in 1962 in three of eight siblings where the father was the mother's paternal uncle. Because of physical appearance and the present of acid mucopolysaccharides in the urine, Dyggve believed that their affected patients had Morquio-Ullrich disease (now Morquio syndrome). Skeletal abnormalities in this condition may include a barrel-shaped chest with a short truck, partial dislocation of the hips, genu valgum (knocked knees) or varum (bowed legs), and decreased joint mobility. In 11% of patients, there is atlantoaxial (upper neck vertebrae) instability that can lead to spinal cord compression, weakness and paralysis. Normally, there is growth deficiency resulting in short stature. Radiographic findings in older children and adults are pathognomonic for the disorder. DMC results from mutations in the DYM (dymeclin) gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive mode.



A variant of DMC syndrome, Smith-McCort syndrome (SMS), which was first described by Smith and McCort in 1958, has identical skeletal abnormalities, but lacks the intellectual disability. SMS is also caused by mutations in DYM, and thus is allelic to DMC. Both are classified as osteochondrodysplasias, specifically a spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia; this latter category of dysplasias consists of 28 separate disorders.

Resources

Human Growth Foundation

997 Glen Cove Avenue

Suite 5

Glen Head, NY 11545

Tel: (516)671-4041

Fax: (516)671-4055

Tel: (800)451-6434

Email: hgf1@hgfound.org

Internet: http://www.hgfound.org/



MAGIC Foundation

6645 W. North Avenue

Oak Park, IL 60302

Tel: (708)383-0808

Fax: (708)383-0899

Tel: (800)362-4423

Email: mary@magicfoundation.org

Internet: http://www.magicfoundation.org



March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation

1275 Mamaroneck Avenue

White Plains, NY 10605

Tel: (914)997-4488

Fax: (914)997-4763

Tel: (888)663-4637

Email: Askus@marchofdimes.com

Internet: http://www.marchofdimes.com



The Arc

1825 K Street NW, Suite 1200

Washington, DC 20006

Tel: (202)534-3700

Fax: (202)534-3731

Tel: (800)433-5255

TDD: (817)277-0553

Email: info@thearc.org

Internet: http://www.thearc.org



Little People of America, Inc.

250 El Camino Real Suite 201

Tustin, CA 92780

Tel: (714)368-3689

Fax: (714)368-3367

Tel: (888)572-2001

Email: info@lpaonline.org

Internet: http://www.lpaonline.org/



NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

31 Center Dr

Building 31, Room 2A32

MSC2425

Bethesda, MD 20892

Fax: (866)760-5947

Tel: (800)370-2943

TDD: (888)320-6942

Email: NICHDInformationResourceCenter@mail.nih.gov

Internet: http://www.nichd.nih.gov/



For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

Last Updated:  3/13/2012

Copyright  1992, 1999, 2005, 2009, 2012 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

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